This Bookshelf Hack Will Eliminate Content Challenges

This blog post describes strategies to appease conservative parent readers or eliminate students triggered by difficult literature, while still endorsing rigorous and AP-level books.

Tips For Making Shakespeare Fun

For 12 years now I've been teaching English Language Arts to high school students, and with most ELA course loads inevitably come a healthy dose of Shakespeare. Throughout my career, I've taught the following Shakespearean works: Romeo and Juliet Julius Caesar Hamlet Macbeth King Lear Othello The Taming of the Shrew Henry VI, Part I… Continue reading Tips For Making Shakespeare Fun

Flexible vs. Assigned Seating in the High School Classroom

If you're like me and you are on Instagram or Twitter, the most buzzed about educational topic this summer seems to be flexible seating. And while it may be a movement more common among teachers of younger learners, there is still a lot of merit in using flexible seating in a high school classroom. However,… Continue reading Flexible vs. Assigned Seating in the High School Classroom

Why I’m Obsessed with Guided Reading Notes

A few years ago, back in the first few years teaching at my current school, I was teaching on what was called an "overload" schedule. For those of you unfamiliar, it's the schedule they give you when all the money is gone. For three years I taught six out of seven periods, five preps a… Continue reading Why I’m Obsessed with Guided Reading Notes

Reflections and Insights From the 2018 AP Lit Reading

Last week I spent seven days in Kansas City grading 1325 essays in a giant room that was too cold and filled with over a thousand tired educators. And it was an amazingly wonderful experience. AP® is a trademark registered by the College Board, which is not affiliated with, and does not endorse, this website. This… Continue reading Reflections and Insights From the 2018 AP Lit Reading